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“Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.”

June 2, 2009

Dorothy and her buddies trembled with fear until Toto revealed that the all powerful wizard was a simple carny, albeit with some pretty sweet production equipment. That was kind of my reaction a few months ago when out of sheer frustration I signed onto Twitter.

Instantly, I was in Oz. Nothing was as it seemed. The rules I expected weren’t there. Tiny blips of truncated words married to strange punctuation were flying by with barely a chance to read them let alone figure out whether or how to respond. I had come looking for … I don’t know … A way to make money? Someone who would hire me? A way to grow a professional network where calls for my legal service would pour in like water off the roof in a monsoon? Whatever is was, Twitter wasn’t it. And so I just sat back and watched for a few weeks, long enough to recognize the wealth that was there all the time. Like Dorothy, I discovered that The Wizard wasn’t a wizard at all, but he was a pretty wise guy: sometimes the richest things are right there before our eyes. Perhaps Twitter isn’t a medium to replace the job you’ve lost or a way to get more orders by asking for business (BTW- Tweeting folks and asking them to order your product is TwitDeath).

My pitch for Twitter has nothing to do with a magical way to “monetize” it (Who made up that verb? It’s really awful). I pitch Twitter because it represents a window into exactly what’s happening instantly – at any moment. It delights me because I can select where my attention should be focused to get cutting edge information on anything or just randomly scan what a lot of really smart people think is important. I follow both professionals and individuals to gather the riches of technical know how, legal developments and simple human interest Tweets. 140 characters is a perfect format (K.I.S.S., right?), and the ReTweet is just brilliant: exponential growth in distribution of ideas is a neat concept. The wealth it brings need not be measured in money (though it undoubtedly can for a few), but it can certainly provide astonishing value for every single individual or business who takes the time to open a free account and go idea exploring.

If you like, develop a personality with your insight, your wit or your skills. This “branding yourself” thing is a bit hard to grasp at first, but astonishingly powerful. Alternatively, have fun culling the best from the brightest. They’re giving away valuable information in a brilliantly counter intuitive marketing turnabout that is revolutionizing the notion of advertising.

See what Business Week’s Executive Editor, John Byrne, has to say about why he uses Twitter:

How I Use Twitter

Now, instead of clicking your heels, just click here:

https://twitter.com/signup

It won’t bring you to Kansas, but it will place you in the middle of a spectacular tornado of ideas.

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. Your love permalink
    June 2, 2009 9:36 pm

    I suppose one day in the not too distant future, I will be reading “Twittering for Dummies”. The jargon alone can boggle the mind of us who are cyber-challenged . I can begin to see many applications for “tweeting” and I better soon climb aboard and get my twass in gear before “plinking” gets hot and many of us are still tweetily behind. So, wanna “tweet” with me???

    • cejesq permalink
      June 3, 2009 1:01 pm

      Tweetily Dee and Tweetily Dumb? LOL – Thnx for the comment

  2. Your love permalink
    June 2, 2009 9:36 pm

    I suppose one day in the not too distant future, I will be reading “Twittering for Dummies”. The jargon alone can boggle the mind of us who are cyber-challenged. I can begin to see many applications for “tweeting” and I better soon climb aboard and get my twass in gear before “plinking” gets hot and many of us are still tweetily behind. So, wanna “tweet” with me???

  3. Your love permalink
    June 2, 2009 9:39 pm

    beautifully written C…..

  4. June 3, 2009 12:24 pm

    You really have a great understanding of Twitter. Comparing it to Oz is brilliant. For me, the key points here are the 140 characters, the power of the ReTweet and best of all, the ability to use Twitter to “brand yourself.”

    Thanks,
    Cath

    • cejesq permalink
      June 3, 2009 12:58 pm

      Thanks. It’s hard to explain in the abstract. Glad you liked the comparison.

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